jeudi 26 avril 2007

Suppression d'un fichier avec des caractères spéciaux

Comment supprimer un fichier en ligne de commande qui contient des caractères spéciaux ?

Ci dessous plusieurs solutions, une interactive puis une autre avec les inodes.

Exemple:

$ ll ftp*
-rw-r--r-- 1 root sys 0 Apr 26 10:13 ftp.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 root sys 0 Apr 26 10:13 ftp??

$ rm ftp^A^?\?
rm: cannot lstat `ftp\001\177?': No such file or directory
[Exit 1 ]


-1- Suppression Interactive

Avec un rm -i * on force la demande de suppression:

$ rm -i ftp*
rm: remove regular empty file `ftp.txt'? n
rm: remove regular empty file `ftp\177?'? y


-2- Avec le listing des inodes

$ ll -i ftp*
206 -rw-r--r-- 1 root sys 0 Apr 26 10:13 ftp.txt
205 -rw-r--r-- 1 root sys 0 Apr 26 10:13 ftp??

$ find . -xdev -type f -inum 205 -ls
205 0 -rw-r--r-- 1 root sys 0 Apr 26 10:13 ./ftp\177?

On force la suppression du fichier qui a l'inode numéro 205

$ find . -xdev -type f -inum 205 -exec rm -f {} \;

mercredi 18 avril 2007

HPUX: Tips Gestion des Packages

Installer un package en ligne

swinstall -v -x allow_multiple_versions=true -x verbose=1 -x mount_all_filesystems=false -s "$depot" "$name"

ou $depot => xpm-3.4k-hppa-11.00.depot
et $name => xpm


Enlever un package récalcitrant

- swremove to remove package in swlist's host system
- stop/start of swagentd
- enforce_dependencies=false in swremove option while removing from depot.


Lister les programmes installé: swlist

Liste des produits:
$ swlist -l product

Liste des fileset:
$ swlist -l fileset

Liste des depot:
$ swlist -l depot
$ swlist -s mmstyy00:/

List all products with revision and description for each:
$ swlist all product | more

List all filesets which have a state other than configured:
$ swlist all fileset a state | grep -v -e '^#' -e configured

List all patches in the depot /var/MyDepot on the system grendel:
$ swlist -d -l product *,c=patch @ grendel:/var/MyDepot

List the filesets modified by installed patch PHSS_8675
$ swlist -a ancestor PHSS_8675

List all of the files delivered within patch PHCO_12140 after downloading from the ITRC:
$ swlist -d -l file @ /tmp/PHCO_12140.depot

List all the files delivered within product:
$ swlist -l file HP-APA-KRN

List all patches that have modified the LVM product
$ swlist -l patch LVM

Display the documentation for all patches containing critical functionality
$ swlist -a readme -l product *,c=critical

List all category tags defined in the depot /var/MyDepot on the system grendel
$ swlist -d -l category @ grendel:/var/MyDepot


Lire le Readme d'un package


swlist -s mmsdyy00:/SD_CDROM -a readme J5316AA


Commit patches

Efface la sauvegarde faite dans "/var/adm/sw/save/"
$ swmodify -x patch_commit=true '*.*'

Création

Créer un .depot

$ swpackage -x target_type=tape -s \* @ /tmp/isee_customise.depot
$ swpackage -x target_type=tape -s NomPackage @ /tmp/NomPackage.depot


Enregistrer le depot

$ swreg -l depot

*Supprimer l'accés distant
$ swreg -u -l depot

Préparation

$ swcopy -x enforce_dependencies=false -s / ISEEPlatform @
$ swask -s ISEE-Chorus

Résultat dans: /catalog/ISEE-Chorus/pfile/response

ou encore:
# Depot=MCPS-SHC
$ swcopy -s MCPS-SHC @
$ swask -s MCPS-SHC

Install

swinstall -s mmstyy00:/


Procédure Complete

# Depot=MCPS-SHC
$ swacl -l root -M user:root@:a
$ swcopy -s MCPS-SHC @
$ swinstall -s MCPS-SHC
$ swask -s MCPS-SHC
$ swinstall -s MCPS-SHC @ hostA hostB

Gestion des droits

- Pour autoriser l'utilisateur marie à ajouter de nouveaux produits au dépôt :
$ swacl -l depot -M user:marie:a [@ hôte:dépôt]

- Pour autoriser l'utilisateur marie à modifier les produits existants d'un dépôt :
$ swacl -l product -M user:marie:a \* [@ hôte]

- Pour modifier le modèle de telle sorte que l'utilisateur marie puisse modifier les nouveaux produits créés par d'autres dans le dépôt :
$ swacl -l global_product_template -M user:marie:a [@ hôte]


Pour authoriser un utilisateur distant à gérer un depot:

# Exemple: user=unix host=mmsdyy00 depot=/mkenv/sw-depot
# A executer sur mmstyy00

$ swacl -l depot -M user:unix@mmsdyy00:a @ /mkenv/sw-depot
$ swacl -l depot -M user:root@mmsdyy00:a @ /mkenv/sw-depot
$ swacl -l depot -M host:mmsdyy00:a @ /mkenv/sw-depot


$ swacl -l depot -M host:mmsdyy00:a
$ swacl -l product -M host:mmsdyy00:a \*
$ swacl -l global_product_template -M host:mmsdyy00:a


Lister les droits d'un dépot:

$ swacl -l depot @ /mkenv/sw-depot

HPUX: LVM quick reference guide

I) How to create a Volume Group (VG).


Note The following example is using the disk c1t6d0, the volume
group vg01 and the logical volume lvhome

1) Prepare the disk
pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0

Note if the disk was previously used in another VG use the
following command instead:

pvcreate -f /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0

2) Create the Volume Group (VG):
a) mknod /dev/vg01/group c 64 0x010000

Note: the group number (last parameter) is in hexadecimal and
should be different for each volume group. For vg02, that number
would be 0x020000. The default limit is 10 volume groups as set by
the kernel parameter maxvgs.

b) vgcreate /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1d0s2

Note: When a volume group is created the maximum physical
extents per volume (max_pe parameter) will be set to the max_pe
of the largest physical volume (PV) or 1016, which ever is
greater, if no max_pe is specified. The effect of not setting
the max_pe parameter would be that any PV added to the volume
group in the future regardless of there size will be limited
to the volume groug creation value of max_pe. Therefore,
consider increasing the max_pe to accommodate PV's that may
likely be larger than the largest PV used to create the Volume
Group. The formula to use to determine the value is:

physical_extent_size * max_pe = size_of_the_disk.

The default value for physical_extent_size is 4M and the maximum
value for max_pe is 65535 (example for 18 gig disk use a value
4608 for max_pe: 4M * 4608 = 18 gig).
There is also a default value of a maximum of 16 disks per volume
group. The following is an example of the creation of a volume
group modifying these two parameters (max_pe = 4608, maximum
number of disk = 24):

vgcreate -e 4608 -p 24 /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1d0s2


II) How to create a Logical Volume (LV) and mount the filesystem.
1) Create the Logical Volume (LV)
lvcreate -L 120 -n lvhome /dev/vg01
Note: this will create a logical volume of 120 meg.
2) Create the filesystem
newfs -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvhome
Note: to create an hfs filesystem change vxfs to
hfs in the previous command.
3) Mount the Logical Volume:
a) mkdir /home
b) mount /dev/vg01/lvhome /home


III) How to add a disk to a Volume Group
Note The following examples is using the disk c1t6d0 and the volume
group vg01

1) Prepare the disk
pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0

Note if the disk was previously used in another VG use the
following command instead:

pvcreate -f /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0

Note: Use caution when using pvcreate -f as this will
overwrite the existing volume group information on the disk.

2) Add the disk to the Volume Group
vgextend /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1t6d0


IV) How to increase the size of a logical volume without online JFS
(advanced JFS).
Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome

Note: Increasing the root filesystem (/) is not feasible

1) lvextend -L 240 /dev/vg01/lvhome
The new total size will be 240M.
2) umount /home
Note: If the filesystem is in use, it is impossible to unmount it.
Therefore stop all the processes (applications) that use the
filesystem then unmount it.
Processes that use /usr and /var cannot be all stopped,
the only solution is to reboot in single user mode.
3) extendfs -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvhome
4) mount /dev/vg01/lvhome /home


V) How to remove a Logical Volume
Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome
1) Backup all user data
2) Umount the filesystem
umount /home
3) remove the Logical volume
lvremove /dev/vg01/lvhome


VI) How to reduce the size of a logical volume without online JFS (advanced JFS)
Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome
1) Backup all user data
2) Umount the filesystem
umount /home
3) Reduce the size
lvreduce -L 60 /dev/vg01/lvhome
Note: the new total size will be 60M.
4) Re-create the filesystem
newfs -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvhome
Note: to create an hfs filesystem change vxfs by
hfs in the previous command.
5) Mount the Logical Volume:
mount /dev/vg01/lvhome /home
6) Restore the user data


VII) How to remove a disk from a volume group
Note: the following example is using the disk c1t6d0 and the
volume group vg01

1) Make sure that the disk is not in use:
pvdisplay /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
Look at line starting with Allocated PE the number at the end
of the line should be 0. If it is not the disk is still in use.
2) Remove the disk
vgreduce /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1t6d0


VIII) How to remove a volume group
Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome

1) Backup all user data
2) Find the name of all logical volume in this volume group
vgdisplay -v /dev/vg01
3) unmount all logical volumes
Note: repeat the following command for each logical command
umount /dev/vg01/lvhome
4) Remove the volume group:
vgexport /dev/vg01
Note: using vgexport to remove a volume group is easier
and faster than using the vgreduce on each physical volume
except the last one, followed by a vgremove. The other
advantage is that the /dev/vg01 directory is also removed.




IX) How to increase the primary swap

Note: Because of the contiguous allocation policy, create a bigger
logical volume and modify the Boot Data Reserved Area (BDRA) to make it
primary.

1) lvcreate -C y -L 240 /dev/vg00
The name of this new logical volume will be displayed on the
screen, note it, it will be needed later. (let say it
is /dev/vg00/lvol8)
Note: This new logical volume has to be in vg00
2) lvlnboot -v /dev/vg00
This will display the current root and swap volumes
Note: lvol2 is the default primary swap.
3) lvlnboot -s /dev/vg00/lvol8 /dev/vg00
Note: use the logical volume name from step 1
4) lvlnboot -R /dev/vg00
Recover any missing links to all of the logical volumes specified
in the BDRA and update the BDRA of each bootable physical volume in
the volume group
5) reboot the system



X) How to create a secondary boot disk
Note: This will create an identical copy of the current vg00. The
new volume group needs to as big as vg00. This will also be a static
version of the primary boot disk which could be use in case of
problem.

Note: The following example is using the disk c1t6d0 and the
volume group vg01

1) Initialize the disk and make it bootable
pvcreate -B /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0
Note: the -B parameter tells pvcreate that this will be a bootable
disk.
mkboot /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
mkboot -a "hpux" /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0
2) Create the volume group
mkdir /dev/vg01
mknod /dev/vg01/group c 64 0x010000
vgcreate /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
3) Find the size of each logical volume in vg00
vgdisplay -v /dev/vg00 | more
look at LV Size (Mbytes) for each logical volume and note it.
Note: this example will use these value:
lvol1 84M
lvol2 256M
lvol3 140M
lvol4 500M
lvol5 64M
lvol6 20M
lvol7 500M
lvol8 500M

Note: The size of the new logical volumes needs to be exactly the
same as the size of the logical volumes on the primary root disk.
4) Create the first 3 logical volumes contiguous (needed by the system)
lvol1:
lvcreate -L 84 -C y -r n /dev/vg01
lvol2:
lvcreate -L 256 -C y -r n /dev/vg01
lvol3:
lvcreate -L 140 -C y -r n /dev/vg01
5) Now create the other logical volumes
lvol4:
lvcreate -L 500 /dev/vg01
lvol5:
lvcreate -L 64 /dev/vg01
lvol6:
lvcreate -L 20 /dev/vg01
lvol7:
lvcreate -L 500 /dev/vg01
lvol8:
lvcreate -L 500 /dev/vg01
6) Copy each logical volume except the swap which is usually lvol2.
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol1 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol1 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol3 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol3 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol4 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol4 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol5 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol5 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol6 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol6 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol7 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol7 bs=1024k
dd if=/dev/vg00/rlvol8 of=/dev/vg01/rlvol8 bs=1024k
7) Verify the integrity of all the new volume except swap.
Note: The following lines are base on a system with vxfs
filesystems except for /stand (lvol1) which needs to be hfs.
fsck -F hfs /dev/vg01/rlvol1
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol3
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol4
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol5
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol6
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol7
fsck -F vxfs /dev/vg01/rlvol8
8) Now configure the Boot Data Reserved Area (BDRA)
Note: The following commands assume that /stand is lvol1,
swap is lvol2 and / is lvol3
lvlnboot -b /dev/vg01/lvol1 /dev/vg01
lvlnboot -r /dev/vg01/lvol3 /dev/vg01
lvlnboot -s /dev/vg01/lvol2 /dev/vg01
lvlnboot -d /dev/vg01/lvol2 /dev/vg01
9) Modify the fstab file on the new disk.
a) If /tmp_mnt doesn't exist create it
mkdir /tmp_mnt
b) Mount the new root filesystem on /tmp_mnt
mount /dev/vg01/lvol3 /tmp_mnt
c) change to etc directory on the new disk.
cd /tmp/etc
d) Modify all occurence of vg00 in the fstab for vg01
sed "s/vg00/vg01/" fstab > fstab.out
mv fstab fstab.BAK
mv fstab.out fstab
e) Unmount the new root filesystem
cd /
umount /tmp_mnt



XI) How to mirror a logical volume
Note: Data mirroring is provided by an additionnal purchasable
software product called MirrorDisk/UX.

Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome

To add a mirror to an existing logical volume:
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg01/lvhome

This will add 1 mirror (2 copies of the filesystem).
To add 2 mirrors (3 copies of the filesystem) use -m 2 instead.

To create a new logical volume of 200M with 1 mirror:
lvcreate -m 1 -L 200 /dev/vg01


XII) How to unmirror a logical volume
Note: the following example is using the volume group vg01 and the
logical volume lvhome

lvreduce -m 0 /dev/vg01/lvhome


XIII) How to create a mirrored boot disk

Note the following example is using the disk c1t6d0 as the
mirrored boot disk and c0t6d0 as the boot disk.

1) Initialize the disk and make it bootable
pvcreate -B /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0
Note: the -B parameter tell pvcreate that this will be a
bootable disk.
2) Add the physical volume to the volume group
vgextend /dev/vg01 /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
3) Use mkboot to place the boot utilities in the boot area and add
the AUTO file.
mkboot /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
mkboot -a "hpux -lq" /dev/rdsk/c1t6d0
4) Use mkboot to update the AUTO file on the primary boot
disk.
mkboot -a "hpux -lq" /dev/rdsk/c0t6d0
5) Mirror the stand, root and swap logical volumes
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol1
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol2
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg00/lvol3
Note: LVM will resynchronize the new mirror copies. This step will
takes several minutes

Repeat the lvextend for all other logical volumes on the boot
mirror.
6) Modify your alternate boot path to point to the mirror copy of the
boot disk.
setboot -a 8/8.6.0 # Use the Hardware path for your new
boot disk.


XIV) How to mirror a logical volume on a specific physical volume

Note: the following example, is using the disk c1t6d0 for the
primary copy, c2t6d0 for the mirror copy, the volume group vg01,
the logical volume lvhome and the size will be 200M

lvcreate -n lvhome /dev/vg01
lvextend -L 200 /dev/vg01/lvhome /dev/dsk/c1t6d0
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg01/lvhome /dev/dsk/c2t6d0


XV) How to create a Physical Volume Group (PVG)
create a file named /etc/lvmpvg with the following syntax:
VG vg_name
PVG pvg_name
pv_path
...
PVG pvg_name
pv_path
...
VG vg_name
PVG pvg_name
pv_path
...

For example, to use two PVGs in vg01 with c1t6d0 and c2t6d0
in one PVG (PVG0), c3t6d0 and c4t6d0 in the other PVG (PVG1) the
contents of the file (/etc/lvmpvg) should be:

VG /dev/vg01
PVG PVG0
/dev/dsk/c1t6d0
/dev/dsk/c2t6d0
PVG PVG1
/dev/dsk/c3t6d0
/dev/dsk/c4t6d0


XVI) How to use PVG to mirror logical volumes on specific physical volumes.

Note: in the following text, the volume group will be vg01 and the
logical volume will be name lvhome

After creating the /etc/lvmpvg file as describe above, each copy
of your mirror could be force on different PVG. To achieve this if
the logical volume is already created but not mirrored yet, use the
following command:
lvchange -s g /dev/vg01/lvhome
lvextend -m 1 /dev/vg01/lvhome
If the logical volume is not created yet:
lvcreate -s g -m 1 -n lvhome -L 200 /dev/vg01




Index:
Regular tasks
I) How to create a Volume Group (VG).
II) How to create a Logical Volume (LV) and mount the filesystem.
III) How to add a disk to a Volume Group
IV) How to increase the size of a logical volume without OnlineJFS
(advanced JFS)
V) How to remove a Logical Volume
VI) How to reduce the size of a logical volume without OnlineJFS
(advanced JFS)
VII) How to remove a disk from a volume group
VIII) How to remove a volume group
IX) How to increase the primary swap
X) How to create a secondary boot disk
LVM Mirroring
XI) How to mirror a logical volume
XII) How to unmirror a logical volume
XIII) How to create a mirrored boot disk
XIV) How to mirror a logical volume on a specific physical volume
Physical Volume Group
XV) How to create a Physical Volume Group (PVG)
XVI) How to use PVG to mirror logical volumes on specific physical
volumes.

HPUX: build a kernel via the command line

Sometimes it is necessary to build a kernel via the command line instead of using SAM. This document will provide the instructions to do that.

CONFIGURATION: Operating System - HP-UX Version - 10.X, 11.X Hardware System - HP 9000 Series - N/A RESOLUTION 10.X:

1. Change directories to /stand/build.
cd /stand/build

2. Create a new system file from the running kernel.
/usr/lbin/sysadm/system_prep -s /stand/build/system

3. Update the system file with the planned changes using
vi /stand/build/system or kmtune(1m).
Example setting nproc tunable to 400:
kmtune -s nproc=400 -S /stand/build/system

4. Build the new kernel.
/usr/sbin/mk_kernel -s /stand/build/system

5. Move the old system and vmunix files so if anything goes wrong, the system can be booted from the old kernel.
mv /stand/system /stand/system.prev
mv /stand/build/system /stand/system
mv /stand/vmunix /stand/vmunix.prev
mv /stand/build/vmunix_test /stand/vmunix

6. Reboot the system off the new kernel.
shutdown -r

11.X:

1. Change directories to /stand/build.
cd /stand/build

2. Create a new system file from the running kernel.
/usr/lbin/sysadm/system_prep -s /stand/build/system

3. Edit the kernel with the planned changes.
vi /stand/build/system

4. Build the new kernel.
/usr/sbin/mk_kernel -s /stand/build/system

5. Move the old system and vmunix files so if anything goes wrong, the system can be booted from the old kernel.
mv /stand/system /stand/system.prev

6. Move the new system file and new kernel into place, ready to be used when rebooting the system.
mv /stand/build/system /stand/system
kmupdate /stand/build/vmunix_test

NOTE: The kmupdate command will move the /stand/vmunix kernel to /stand/vmunix.prev and the newly created kernel to /stand/vmunix as part of the shutdown process.

7. Reboot the system off the new kernel.
shutdown -r

More information is available in the HP-UX System Administration Tasks manual. man manuals will give you ordering information and part numbers.

Most HP documentation is avaialable online at: http://www.docs.hp.com

I Forgot the Root Password

I Forgot the Root Password

Originally prepared by Peggy Bruehl

The following info was collected from a variety of sources including HP-UX Manuals, and the hpux-admin mailing list.

If you have forgotten the root password on you HP Workstation, you must go through the following steps:

Ask all other users to log off the workstation.
Type the command sync four times to clear the buffer cache.
If you have installed sudo, or if you have enabled a user other than root to reboot the machine, reboot your workstation.

If you can not reboot the machine, press the reset button to force a reboot. Don't press the reset button unless you can't get the machine to reboot any other way.

During the reboot, press the ESC key to interrupt the reboot.

This will bring you to the BOOT_ADMIN prompt. From here, boot to the ISL with the command boot scsi.X.0 isl where scsi.X.0 is the SCSI address of your internal disk drive. (To find that address, use the path command at the BOOT_ADMIN prompt.)

Now you are at the ISL prompt. Boot up into single user mode with the command hpux -is (or if you are still running 9.X use the command hpux -is boot disk(scsi.X;0)/hp-ux, where again scsi.X.0 is the SCSI address of your internal disk drive.)

After the machine has come up in single user mode, you can try to set the root password by running the passwd command. If the program will run, you can enter the new password now. Reboot again (command reboot) and you are done.

If the passwd program will not run in the single user mode, manually edit the /etc/passwd file (be careful!) and take out the root password (second field), leaving the 2 colons side by side.

Now, quickly reboot the machine (reboot) and log in as root. No password is required. Immediately run the passwd command and set a password for root.

It's important to minimize the time between removing the root password from the /etc/passwd file and resetting the password with the passwd command.

During this time, your system is wide open.

C'est Quoi le LOADAVG ???

C'est Quoi le LOADAVG ???

The general concensus was that the load average was for all CPUs.
Basically that is the average number of processes waiting for te
entire system (independent of the number of CPUs in the system).

As a rule of thumb you could consider a load of 1 on a single CPU
server the same as a load of 4 on a 4 CPU server. (euhh, à vérifier :) )

Also it was pointed out that the load average will mean different
things depening on what kind of work the server is doing.

SSH: Authentication with PublicKeys

Ce document explique les différentes étapes pour mettre en place l'authentification par clef
publiques.

Les avantages tirés sont pluriel:
  • Evite la propagation des mots de passe ( celui de root en particulier ),
  • Evite l'utilisation d'un mot de passe trop simple, souvent utilisé pour ne pas l'oublier, et car les connexions sont nombreuses dans une journée,
  • Ajoute une granularité dans la mise en place de la sécurité,
  • Facilite le travail quotidien, par des connexions plus rapides.
Coté client
Création des paires de clef privée/publiques cliente.

Les clef sont crée avec la commande `ssh-keygen', il vous sera demander un nom
de fichier, acceptez celui par défaut, puis une pass-phrase (Le mot de passe),
veillez à en choisir un assé long, une phrase serait l'idéal.

$ ssh-keygen -t rsa1 # SSH1
$ ssh-keygen -t rsa # SSH2
$ ssh-keygen -t dsa # SSH2


L'agent ssh

Maintenant pour éviter d'avoir à taper notre passphrase à chaque connexion,
nous allons utiliser la commande `ssh-agent'. Grâce à lui, nous n'aurons qu'à
taper notre passphrase qu'une fois au début de la journée:

$ eval $(ssh-agent)
Agent pid 2592

puis il nous faut ajouter nos clef.
Rem: si vous avez choisi la même passphrase pour toutes les trois clef, elle
ne vous sera demandée qu'une seulle fois:

$ ssh-add
Enter passphrase for ~/.ssh/id_rsa:
Identity added: ~/.ssh/id_rsa (~/.ssh/id_rsa)
Identity added: ~/.ssh/id_dsa (~/.ssh/id_dsa)
Identity added: ~/.ssh/identity (Philippe@MyHost)



On peut verifier qu'elles ont bien été prises en compte:

$ ssh-add -l
2048 9a:08:b9:b8:e6:25:bd:6c:4e:8c:25:13:2e:36:62:97 Philippe@MyHost (RSA1)
2048 5b:7f:cd:96:2c:f4:41:66:1a:83:4b:ff:ad:89:85:42 ~/.ssh/id_rsa (RSA)
2048 9a:e0:e3:af:b8:65:a1:c6:06:2c:80:8e:8a:1a:c9:30 ~/.ssh/id_dsa (DSA)


Coté client c'est Fait.

Coté serveur

passons sur l'installation du serveur ssh, et concentrons nous sur le
spécifique pour accepter l'Authentification par Clef publiques.


La configuration du serveur:

Les options suivante doivent être présentes dans le fichier de conf :

/opt/ssh/etc/sshd_config:

RSAAuthentication yes
PubkeyAuthentication yes
AuthorizedKeysFile .ssh/authorized_keys

StrictModes no # Si les droits sur le $HOME ne sont pas 0700



puis pour recharger la config :

$ kill -1 $(cat /var/run/sshd.pid)

Ajout des clef.

Pour que la connexion soit possible, il nous faut rajouter la(les) clef
publique dans le fichier d'authorization:

Après avoir copié sur le serveur la clef publique (DSA):

$ cat id_dsa.pub >>$HOME/.ssh/authorized_keys

Test de connexion

$ ssh unix@support
MyHost [HP Release B.11.00]
Last successful login for unix: Tue Sep 20 15:12:54 MET-1METDST 2005 on pts/43
Last unsuccessful login for unix: Tue Sep 20 09:58:07 MET-1METDST 2005 on pts/tp
Last login: Mon Aug 29 20:19:36 2005 from otherhost
You have mail.


Dans les logs:

Sep 20 15:17:32 myhost sshd[24103]: Accepted publickey for unix from 192.168.1.2 port 3546 ssh2

Attacher un fichier Image ISO

Pour monter un CD:
$ mount -F cdfs -o cdcase
ou
$ mount -F cdfs

Attacher un fichier Image ISO:
$ nohup /usr/sbin/pfs_mountd&
$ nohup /usr/sbin/pfsd&
$ /usr/sbin/pfs_mount -t iso9660 -x unix /images/cd.iso /mnt
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$ /usr/sbin/pfs_mount -t iso9660 /images/cd.iso /mnt